The birthplace of meaning

“But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, though you are small …” – Micah 5:2

For such a small place, Bethlehem holds a mountain of meaning. The Hebrew word has two parts. The first part is the usual word for house, but it has connotations of family. It can also mean temple. “Bethel” in the Bible means “House of God.”

The second part of Bethlehem is the Hebrew word for bread, but this bread is not just the side item on your plate. It is what Jesus was talking about when he taught us to pray, “Give us today our daily bread.” This bread is the difference between life and death.

There is another connotation to that second part of the word Bethlehem. Sometimes, it can mean “to do battle or fight.” It is not the usual meaning attached to the name, but there is this strong connection.

When we put all that together, something like a little miracle emerges in what God has woven into the name of the place where Jesus was born. Jesus, the Bread of Life, was born in a place called “House of Bread.” The one who did battle with death itself and won, who was raised to victory after three days in a grave, was born in a place called “House of Battle.”

God chose a seemingly insignificant place, Bethlehem, and there he created the Bread of Life and the One who would defeat death. And on the night he gave himself up for us, Jesus lifted up the very symbols of a bakery and a battleground — bread and blood.

Christmas and Easter really do belong in the same breath.

And when we place our trust in Him — this God-man who is spiritual food for us and who promises to do battle in the spiritual realm for us – we are born spiritually into his family and become members of the House of God. Our birthplace then becomes Bethlehem just as surely as his was.

Bethlehem. It is a place of possibility, a place of new birth, a place where we are fed, where we are protected, where we are home.

 

 

(This post was first published in December, 2012, on fivestones.com)

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Make a spectacle of yourself.

Sometimes God uses spectacles. An overly bright star. A cast of angels. A talking donkey. A burning bush.

Sometimes, he makes us the spectacle. In this season, radical kindness would definitely get some attention. It’s a spectacle God can use.

What if we were to make spectacles of ourselves for Jesus this month? And what if you picked a few random acts of kindness and used them to bring attention to your love for Jesus? What if you made the love of Jesus your message and what if you made those random acts your voice?

I want to share 20 easy ideas. Choose two or three to accomplish by Christmas.

1. Pay for the person behind you in line at the drive-through of your choice.

2. Leave a present on top of the mailbox for your mail carrier (label well!).

3. Bake and deliver goodies to someone who would appreciate the pick-me-up.

4. Donate food to a food pantry (how about Mosaic’s Pantry?).

5. Keep a stash of candy canes with notes tied on in your purse, and hand them out to anyone you see who might need a little treat — cashiers, deli workers, taxi drivers…

6. Leave quarters and a note at a laundromat.

7. Leave a note and the correct amount of change on a vending machine.

8. Ask the librarians if you can pay someone else’s past due fee.

9. Buy a gift card for groceries, then turn around and hand it to the next person in line.

10. Leave an extra big tip at a restaurant.

11. Leave an encouraging message in sidewalk chalk on a neighbor’s driveway.

12. Figure out something tiny, nice, and unexpected to do for your co-workers.

13. Bake something for your significant other to share with his/her co-workers.

14. Leave a positive comment on every blog you frequent this month. Trust me, it will make their day, especially the smaller ones.

15. Buy boxes of crayons at a dollar store and give them to kids.

16. Clean out your closet and donate gently-used items to appropriate organizations.

17. Collect all of the travel-size toiletries you have lying around and deliver them to a homeless shelter or battered women’s shelter (or Bags and Hugs).

18. Bring Christmas flowers (like a poinsettia) to a nursing home and ask the front desk staff which resident would most appreciate them.

19. Volunteer to babysit for a particularly sleep-deprived friend or relative.

20. Do a chore for someone else in your household.

In what ways are you planning this season to make light shine in the darkness?

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