#metoo

God can redeem anything. Any wound, rejection, loss … anything.

Last week, the story of Harvey Weinstein’s gross perversion was published, resulting in a groundswell of testimony on social media in the form of two simple words: Me too. If I know anything about the spiritual realm, I’m guessing those two words are taking back territory the enemy thought he had long since conquered. After all, John 3 tells us that things that remain in the dark belong to the enemy of our souls, while things brought into the light belong to Jesus. Most women I know have felt unheard and their stories unvalidated for so long that they’ve learned to leave them tucked away in some dark recess — unvoiced, unvalidated, unexposed. Those stories remain unknown mostly because many women have learned by experience not to cast pearls, so there in the dark, their stories fester and breed shame.

But God … 

Now we have this story about a guy who over decades has used his power to manipulate and molest women. Out of this exposure of a professional predator, a platform has emerged allowing women to stand up and be counted without feeling as if they are on trial. There is a sisterhood in all those “me too’s.” They are two-word witnesses raising old wounds to the surface, allowing women to be heard and their stories validated.

I’m among those women. Molested as a child and raped in college, I have had a first-hand experience of how exposing my story to the healing light of Jesus has produced profound healing in my life. I discovered an undiagnosed anger and found healing from what seemed like an illogical need to please men. My husband received healing, too, when he confessed to Christ his own unforgiveness around those who had hurt me.

He didn’t yell at God or try to justify anything. He just said it like it was. “God, I can’t forgive them.” And in that moment of honesty. God answered so clearly. He said simply, “I was with her the whole time.” The simple truth of that statement was enough to allow Steve to let go of the anger and pain. God knew.

Psalm 139 says, “O Lord, where can I go from your spirit? Or where can I flee from your presence? If I ascend to heaven you are there; if I make my bed in the depths of Sheol, you are there. If I take the wings of the morning and settle at the farthest limits of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me fast.” My husband, Steve, tells me – and scripture confirms it – that when I experienced a little piece of hell, God never left me alone.

I know firsthand the healing power of Jesus, and can now confidently assure anyone with a “me too” story that there is great joy in the healing power of Jesus Christ. If there is unresolved pain, anger, hurt, shame … Jesus can heal that. He knows you, knows your story, and stands ready to offer healing.

Some of the best news of all is this: There is no shame in Christ! Isn’t that a beautiful freedom? In the light of that truth, our stories become our gift and a pathway to healing, knowing that God has never once turned his face from us.

This is the strength of his grace. It is that willingness of God to be there no matter what, so he can be there when we finally turn to him. Prevenient grace is that strong willingness of God to bear our stories of rejection and inadequacy, of dark nights and angry days and even our own stories of sin and shame. God’s grace is strong enough to bear the pain we’ve caused others as well as the pain of others that we feel even years or decades later. God is there through all of it. God has been there the whole time, watching, grieving the pain of it but in his strength, waiting. The Word assures us that he is always more ready to listen than we are to speak, always more ready to offer the healing power of the Holy Spirit than we are to reach out for it. There is a reason we call him Emmanuel: God With Us. It is because he is … always.

Hear this: God knows what you are made of and God knows what you’ve been though. And that same God has never once left you alone or rejected you. Not even once. Not even you.

Carolyn Moore

I follow Jesus within the communities of Mosaic Church, Asbury Seminary and the Moore household.

5 thoughts on “#metoo

  1. Carolyn,

    As a man (who is also a pastor / ATS D.Min alumni) I hesitate to wade into this issue. Please know that my heart is breaking at this whole story, but I am hopeful that opening the shutters and letting some light in will improve things.

    I have a question. I was sexually molested as a child (ages 6-8, 14), so I can relate in some ways. I would like to know how you answer people (or for yourself) who say, “If God was with you the whole time, and presumably able to stop this, why was it allowed to continue?” (I have my own uneasy answer, but I am curious about yours).

    Thanks.

    P.S. I enjoyed your presentation at the New Room conference.

    1. This is a good and valid question. “Why” is the classic, difficult and frustrating question of our faith. Why do bad things happen, when God is supposedly more powerful than evil? Why must people suffer? As a Wesleyan, my answer is rooted in the doctrine of free will. God has chosen free will as the “operating system” for humanity, and has chosen to limit himself in only one way: he has chosen not to interfere with free will. For that reason, humans can make devastating choices with disastrous ripple effects, and God will not — as a rule — override those choices. What he does instead is offer the opportunity of redemption. Given the chance, God will redeem every wound, every memory, every broken piece. He makes beauty from ashes. For me, Kelly, knowing that he was there and that he stood ready to redeem those episodes … that’s enough to get me past the “why” and into the “what next.” I hope that helps.

      1. Thank you. Your answer is essentially the same as mine, but much more eloquent and inspiring. I’m glad I asked. I’m grateful for the redeeming love of God that is still underway for us all.

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